GESTATIONAL DIABETES WAS A BLESSING IN DISGUISE,’ SAYS EMIRATI BUSINESSWOMAN

‘GESTATIONAL DIABETES WAS A BLESSING IN DISGUISE,’ SAYS EMIRATI BUSINESSWOMAN

Nashwa Al Ruwaini, a patient at Imperial College London Diabetes Centre,made lifestyle changes a priority to prevent high-risk pregnancies and long-term complications 

Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, on 7 October2021:

Emirati businesswoman Nashwa Al Ruwaini admits that before she had children, she had an insatiable sweet tooth, was a workaholic and lived a very stressful life.

While her unhealthy lifestyle did not impact on her first pregnancy, the patient of Mubadala Health’s Imperial College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC) – a global leader in diabetes treatment, education and research–had an alarming fasting blood sugar level of 195mg/dL in the second trimester of her second pregnancy in 2010, which signalled to doctors that she had gestational diabetes.

Gestational diabetes is the type of diabetes that is first seen in a pregnant woman who did not have diabetes before she was pregnant, and is more common in the second and third trimester. The risk factors for gestational diabetes include being overweight and obese, lack of physical activity, prediabetes, a family history, polycystic ovary syndrome and previously delivering a baby weighing more than 4kg.The World Health Organization estimates that gestational diabetes affects about seven to 10 per cent of all pregnancies worldwide.

For most women with gestational diabetes, the diabetes resolves itself soon after delivery. When it does not go away, the diabetes is deemedtype 2 diabetes. Even if the diabetes does go away after the baby is born, half of all women who had gestational diabetes develop type 2 diabetes later. Their children are also at risk of developing childhood obesity and are six times more likely to develop type 2 diabetes.

Seeking to inspire other women

In the case of Nashwa, she went on to develop type 2 diabetes in 2012 after her third child and now wants to raise awareness about the dangers of a poor lifestyle and importance of proper diabetes management during pregnancy. She says that being diagnosed with gestational diabetes was the wake-up call she needed to turn her life around.

“I always had bad eating habits, skipped meals and would have a big dinner right before bedtime. When I was told that I had gestational diabetes, I changed my ways because I was worried that the baby would have diabetes or would be affected by my high blood sugar levels. I followed the ICLDC clinical team’s instructions on diabetes management to the letter and was blessed with

a beautiful child,” says Nashwa, who is the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of the Abu Dhabi-based media production and consultancy firm Pyramedia Group.

“I learned that a workaholic like me, who is stressed and neglects herbody’s need for good nutrition and exercise,can easily fall into the vicious trap of diabetes.”

Dr Tarig Abdalla, a consultant endocrinologist and diabetologist at ICLDC who has been assisting Nashwa in her diabetes management since the second pregnancy, says that along with the help of a diabetes educator and dietitian, they were able to reduce her blood sugar levels to the target range of 70 – 120 mg/dL for an uncomplicated pregnancy.

“Nashwa’s blood sugar level was quite high when she came to us, so we had to start her on insulin therapy and advised her on dietary and lifestyle measures. She managed quite well, and her baby was born the right size, which shows that she hadgood control ofher blood sugar.”

Risks for mother and baby

Dr Abdalla explains that there is a high risk to the mother and baby if gestational diabetes is not in check during a pregnancy.

“If it is uncontrolled, the baby is exposed to very high maternal glucose levels, so his or herpancreas will try to deal with this by producing insulin. This causes the child to grow in size and weight, making the delivery difficult, necessitating a C-section. Also, when babies produce too much insulin, sometimes they are born with hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar). This can cause seizures and requires immediate intervention with feeding or an intravenous glucose solution.”

Women can also face high blood pressure and preeclampsia, which is the sign of damage to other organs and can threaten the lives of both mother and baby.

Nashwa says that she was fully aware of these risks and went for regular check-ups throughout the pregnancy.

“I had to deal with hypoglycaemia while I learned how to manage my diabetes during the initial stages. I was constantly worried about how the diabetes might affect my child and I got regularly tested to ensure that my baby was not affected by my yo-yo blood sugar levels. Since I had gone through this once, I was better prepared during my third pregnancy. Throughout this time, I was supported by the team at ICLDC and continue to see Dr Abdalla every three months for an assessment.”

Dr Abdalla says there isa worldwide trend of increasing obesity rates and unhealthy lifestyle habits is fuelling the problem. He adds, “The numbers are also increasing because the diagnostic criteria havechanged in the past decade.  Expectant mothers with a fasting blood sugar level of more than 95 mg/dL are considered to have gestational diabetes.”

But he stressesthis diagnosis means women can turn things around on time. “Ninety per cent of women who have gestational diabetes can successfully manage their blood sugar with diet and

lifestyle changes alone. This is positive news because it increases their awareness about type 2 diabetes and makes them adopt healthy habits for themselves and their children.”

Nashwa echoes her doctor’s advice, saying: “We should all take good care of ourselves, nourish our bodies with nutritious food, movement and rest. I’m always worried for my children too and try to lead by example.I’ve madeeating a healthy diet and exercising regularly integral to our lives and keep a watch on the risk factors and symptoms of type 2diabetes.”

-ENDS-

About Mubadala Health

Mubadala Health is the integrated healthcare network of Mubadala Investment Company. Established in 2021, Mubadala Health operates, manages, and develops a portfolio of healthcare assets including: Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi, Healthpoint, Imperial College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC), Amana Healthcare, National Reference Laboratory (NRL), Capital Health Screening Centre (CHSC), Abu Dhabi Telemedicine Centre (ADTC), Danat Al Emarat, HealthPlus Diabetes & Endocrinology Center, HealthPlus Family Clinics, HealthPlus Fertility, HealthPlus Women’s Health Center, Moorfields Eye Hospital Abu Dhabi, and a stake in Al Meswak Dental Clinics Group. With a vision to transform the regional healthcare landscape, Mubadala Health sets a new benchmark for the UAE and regional healthcare industry through its state-of-the-art facilities and world-class caregivers who strive to put patients first across its continuum of care. Innovation, research, and education are the foundational pillars of Mubadala Health, supporting the further development of a sustainable healthcare sector in line with the vision of Abu Dhabi and the region.

Mubadala Health is on Twitter, Instagram, Facebook and LinkedIn with the handle: @mubadalahealth.

About Imperial College London Diabetes Centre:

Imperial College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC), a Mubadala Health partner, is a state-of-the-art outpatient facility that specialises in diabetes treatment, research, training and public health awareness. In just over a decade, the Centre has gained international renown for its holistic approach to the treatment of diabetes and related complications that enables patients to receive the full spectrum of care they need in one place.

With more than 80 diabetes professionals and endocrinologists under one roof, ICLDC offers best-in-class medical attention from first diagnosis to disease management across 11 specialist practice areas including adult and paediatric endocrinology, treatment of metabolic and electrolyte disorders, pre- and post-bariatric surgery care, heart disease prevention, nutritional advice, diabetes education services, ophthalmology, nephrology and podiatry.

ICLDC was established in 2006 in Abu Dhabi by Mubadala in partnership with the UK’s Imperial College London to address the growing demand for diabetes care in the UAE. The centre now operates three branches across Abu Dhabi and Al Ain, touching the lives of more than one million people through patient-centric programmes and public health initiatives. In 2007, ICLDC launched Diabetes. Knowledge.Action, now the longest running public health awareness campaign in the country. The initiative promotes an active lifestyle through an ongoing calendar of events for the whole community – Major activations include an annual walkathon that coincides with the World Diabetes Day in November.

ICLDC holds the Joint Commission International (JCI) Clinical Care Program Certification in Outpatient Diabetes Management and JCI Accreditation for Ambulatory Care.For more information, please visit www.icldc.ae

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